New Addition Update, Month 3

It has been almost a month since my last post about our new addition. Work has been proceeding, albeit slowly at times. It was always a long-shot that we would be (mostly) done by winter, and that long shot is missing widely. Now our sights are set on getting it under roof and closed in (windows/doors would be great but sheathing/house-wrap would be OK) this fall.

Last week and this week things have been moving along at a good clip. As I type, they are finishing installing the LiteDeck IFC for the main floor concrete slab. I will put up another post detailing that process in a couple of days.

Here is chronology of the past month or so of work, as of the end of last week:

The ICF blocks start to go in. In the foreground you can see the ladder-like Form Lock grids that are placed horizontally inside the ICF every couple of courses to help keep things straight and in line. There is lots of vertical and horizontal rebar in there as well.

The ICF blocks start to go in. In the foreground you can see the ladder-like Form Lock grids that are placed horizontally inside the ICF every couple of courses to help keep things straight and in line. There is lots of vertical and horizontal rebar in there as well.

Door and window openings being formed. Waterproofing film applied.

Door and window openings being formed. Waterproofing film applied.

Ready for foundation concrete pour. The metal studs sticking up along the outside perimeter are for attaching the foam boards that will surround the main floor concrete slab. You can also see the support scaffolding around the inside of the foundation forms.

Ready for foundation concrete pour. The metal studs sticking up along the outside perimeter are for attaching the foam boards that will surround the main floor concrete slab. You can also see the support scaffolding around the inside of the foundation forms.

The foundation concrete has been poured in the ICF – that process went pretty well, just had one corner start to separate which was field-braced without further problems. The BobCat is bringing in gravel for under the basement slab. To the left you can see three footers for the posts that will support a steel I-beam. To the right, on top of the foundation, you can see where they moved our temporary well pipe off the ground so they could re-grade around the back of the foundation so the equipment has room to maneuver.

The foundation concrete has been poured in the ICF – that process went pretty well, just had one corner start to separate which was field-braced without further problems. The BobCat is bringing in gravel for under the basement slab. To the left you can see three footers for the posts that will support a steel I-beam. To the right, on top of the foundation, you can see where they moved our temporary well pipe off the ground so they could re-grade around the back of the foundation so the equipment has room to maneuver.

After the gravel and floor drain pipes were done, I took over to prepare the basement underfloor heat tubing. The first step was putting down 2" extruded (XPS ) foam board for insulation. Note the square cutouts for the I-beam post foundations.

After the gravel and floor drain pipes were done, I took over to prepare the basement underfloor heat tubing. The first step was putting down 2″ extruded (XPS ) foam board for insulation. Note the square cutouts for the I-beam post foundations.

Then, based on my heat tube layout drawing (drawings  available here) I snapped some chalk lines, installed my 200 screw-in tubing clips, and started snapping in the 5/8

Then, based on my heat tube layout drawing (drawings available here) I snapped some chalk lines, installed my 200 screw-in tubing clips, and started snapping in the 5/8" PEX-a heat tubing.

Basement heat tubing all in place. I had to make some adjustments to go around the post foundations, but otherwise I came out just a little short of my original drawing. For the sake of economy and availability I used a 300' roll of tubing for the 300' basement run. For the main slabs three 300' runs I have a 1000' roll, so I will have a little slack. And, since I knew all four tubing runs would be a little different in length, I bought a manifold that includes flow control balancing valves.

Basement heat tubing all in place. I had to make some adjustments to go around the post foundations, but otherwise I came out just a little short of my original drawing. For the sake of economy and availability I used a 300′ roll of tubing for the 300′ basement run. For the main slabs three 300′ runs I have a 1000′ roll, so I will have a little slack. And, since I knew all four tubing runs would be a little different in length, I bought a manifold that includes flow control balancing valves.

Then they put rebar on top of the heat tubes. This not only adds strength to the slab but also insures that the heat tubes won't pop out and float to the top of the concrete.

Then they put rebar on top of the heat tubes. This not only adds strength to the slab but also insures that the heat tubes won’t pop out and float to the top of the concrete.

The basement slab pour was perfectly uneventful, just the way all concrete pours should be. After the concrete cured for several days, they built the load-bearing basement partition wall and installed the I-beam, arriving here by crane truck.

The basement slab pour was perfectly uneventful, just the way all concrete pours should be. After the concrete cured for several days, they built the load-bearing basement partition wall and installed the I-beam, arriving here by crane truck.

Then some temporary bracing walls went up – these will need to stay in place for 3 weeks after the main slab pour.

Then some temporary bracing walls went up – these will need to stay in place for 3 weeks after the main slab pour.

Then they started laying the LiteDeck ICF. This is an aerial view of the base layer installation in progress.

Then they started laying the LiteDeck ICF. This is an aerial view of the base layer installation in progress.

Next up: Completing the LiteDeck by shaping the bow window, adding the top hats, adding the perimeter foam and first-course footer board, and adding plumbing/wiring chase-ways. Then, the main floor pour.

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