Addition Ready for Final Concrete Pour

Well, almost, still have to do the final cleanup. We are trying to arrange the final concrete pour, but with winter on the way the concrete tradesmen are very busy trying to get their outdoor pours done.

This pour is about 1068 square feet and will be 4½ – 5 inches thick. It is being poured on top of a suspended concrete slab subfloor. We want to add mica flakes at the end of the pour to add a bit of sparkle. From what we understand, this means trowel-finishing the entire floor.

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Here is the floor plan of the two slabs to be poured. Click to embiggen.

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Our lower driveway will let the concrete truck back right up to addition entryway.

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The concrete pump hoses will enter the addition via the exterior door at the top of the ramp. In this and subsequent pics you will see tools and supplies that will all be gone shortly.

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The vestibule, being closest to the door, will be the last space poured. The concrete will be poured to the top of the 4-1/2″ triple sole plate. The wallboard is already up and painted so we used blue tape and rosin paper to protect it. The space for the yet-to-be-installed 1×8 baseboard provides a space of bare studs to ease with the concrete finishing.

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Just inside the great room from the vestibule there is a staircase to the walk-out basement. The concrete finishers can use this for access as needed.

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The great room and under-loft rooms have 5/8″ pex heat tubing attached to the subfloor. At the upper right is the bow windows and at the upper left is the loft staircase the the concrete will need to flow under.

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A better view of the loft staircase corners where the concrete will go under it.

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Looking towards the loft. On the left you can see the stone chimney and the dumbwaiter enclosure.

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The galley kitchenette. Except for the bathroom toilet and shower drain, all drain pipes are in the wall.

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The view in the bedroom of one of the two closets. You can see more detail of the heat tubing — it is the zip-tied to poultry netting that is stapled to the sole plates. Tapcon screws and various brackets have also been used to help anchor everything down so the tubing does not float up. To the left you can see in the bathroom where the tubing goes through the subfloor to connect with the manifold in the basement.

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The curbless walk-in L-shaped shower. This will get troweled to a semi-rough surface to avoid slipping in the shower (sponge finish?). It will flow under and up against the granite walls and slope down to the drain at the end of the ell (not shown).

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The water closet.

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