(The Last?) Concrete Pour

Apparently we are gluttons for punishment, because this week we called back our concrete contractors. No offence to them, but we sincerely hope this will be the last time we ever see them! This time, it was to pour a floor for the main basement of our old house.

When we moved in to this c.1834 house in 1998, the basement had a dirt floor, which occasionally did double-duty as, um, an ephemeral creek bed. We traced (most of) the water to a poorly-installed-and-therefore-clogged diversion drain that had been installed when the septic system went in the late 1980’s to get the leach field to perk. After we dealt with that, back in the early aughts we had the mud-laid foundation stones mortared in place to direct any remaining water down low to the floor. We then put in a French drain system to drain both cellars out back down the hill.

basement-trench

This is the only pic I could find of the basement trenching project. It comes from a time when my hair — and beard — still had some color.

The trench drain worked, mostly. In ’05 we hired some guys to dig out 8 inches or so of the dirt (Atkins Silt Loam, to be precise) floor. We then had them put in 5 inches or so of gravel. This has served as our basement floor ever since.

basement-pre-gravel

This is what the basement floor looked like before we had it dug out and graveled. You can barely see the stone hearth under the mud (more on the hearth in a bit). Also, in the interim we have relocated the water heater into the new addition.

Fast forward to last summer, when we decided to go ahead and have a concrete slab poured, to complete the conversion into a fully usable space. We spent some time removing and leveling the gravel down so the 3-4″ of concrete would come up to the pre-existing level of the old dirt floor.

The task of leveling the gravel was made much easier by using the optical level with tripod that I bought when I was designing the new addition. You can see the concrete footers for the jack posts (that apparently were installed in the late 80s) that mark the level of the soon-to-be poured concrete.

As always seems to be the case, it took some months to schedule the contractors, but over last weekend we confirmed a pour for Wednesday. Tuesday saw the final preparations.

basement-wood-threshold

The old wood threshold we removed. The top certainly looked worn, but that was nothing compared to the rotten bottom.

basement-concrete-prep-2

I cut off the bottom of the door frame sides so the concrete will flow up to the stone wall. The door frames have a lot of rot (I was shocked — Shocked! — to discover this).

basement-concrete-prep-1

Prep work done.

Wednesday dawned to the sound of contractors banging, yelling (*always* with the yelling, these contractors), and engines delivering and pumping the concrete.

concrete-delivery

This equipment is very noisy; the cat stayed under our bed for the duration of the day.

After several days of curing, the finished floor is now walkable. A far cry from where we found it 18 years ago.

basement-concrete-threshold

Our new (non-rotted) concrete threshold.

basement-concrete-curing

In this view you can see the full-width stone hearth across the north end of the basement. Once the concrete is fully cured (28 days)we will have the hearth pointed up with mortar.
On the wall you can see the outlines of the original 1800’s cooking fireplace. We presume that this was closed off c.1900 when an addition was added and the flue was re-purposed for a wood stove to heat the addition.
The two posts on the hearth are there to support the stone kitchen hearth that we put in during the summer of 2006.

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